Outline of Exhibition

Scenes In and Around Kyoto Screens and Genre Paintings
Period March 27, 2012 - May 6, 2012
Venue Special Exhibition Galleries, National Museum of Japanese History
Admissions

Adults: ¥830 (¥560) Senior high school & college students: ¥450 (¥250)
* Fees in parentheses apply to groups of 20 or more
* Admission to permanent exhibitions included
* Free admission for elementary & junior high school students
* Free admission for senior high school students every Saturday

Hours 9:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m. (entrance closed at 4:30 p.m.)
Closed

Apr 2 (Mon), 9 (Mon) , 16 (Mon), 23 (Mon)

Sponsor National Museum of Japanese History

In the early years of the 16th century, “Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto” appeared, and on these pairs of screens were paintings depicting the landscape of the capital city, Kyoto. In the screen paintings, the scenes in Kyoto, which was reconstructed after the Onin War and transformed into a new modern city, were depicted in detail. The screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto depicting actual society of the city as the subject include many elements from the declarations of people in power to the life of ordinary people, and are very valuable historical materials.

A wide variety of contents depicted in the screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto were categorized into various genres over the passage of time. With close-ups of familiar targets such as famous scenic places, festivities, craftsmen or leisure activities, they developed into paintings focusing on people, which reflected the society and government as the background as well as the changes in people’s viewpoints on the city.

In this exhibition, six screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto, which have had few opportunities to be exhibited all together, and the related painting materials including the materials owned by the National Museum of Japanese History and exhibited for the first time as well as the materials owned by other museums will be displayed, and the development from screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto to genre paintings in early modern times will be systematically presented. To allow visitors to enjoy analyzing the contents of paintings, magnifying devices with touch panels will be set up.

In addition, as the products of “General Research on Rekihaku Ko-hon of Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto” (2009 to 2011) of our collaborative research/scientific research, the reconstructed replica of the Rekihaku Ko-hon of Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto and the database of people will be exhibited.

The above exhibition at the National Museum of Japanese History will be held as Part I of “Painting Cities – Kyoto and Edo- “which is the exhibition developed in cooperation with the National Institutes For The Humanities, and almost simultaneously, Part II “Famous Scenic Places in Edo and Genre Paintings” with the subject theme “Edo” will be held at the National Institute of Japanese Literature, with which we have conducted cooperative research. We hope that visitors will fully enjoy the world of the cities depicted in the paintings more comprehensively through both the exhibitions.

Exhibition Lineup

* Some materials will be replaced during the exhibition period.

1 Establishment of Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto --Paintings of Monthly Genre Scenes /Festivities and Paintings of Cities--

Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto depicting famous scenic places and genre scenes in Kyoto according to their geographical locations were established in the early years of the 16th century. Antecedent to this were screen paintings in which famous scenic places and Tsukinami (monthly) festivities and genre scenes were depicted. Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto maintained their original characteristics after they were established, and Meisho-e (paintings of famous scenic places) and Genre Paintings, which depicted monthly festivities, gradually assumed a phase common to paintings of Scenes In and Around Kyoto in which the cities were depicted.

【Main Artifacts】

Mohon (copy) of Tsukinami Sairei-zu Byobu (screen paintings of monthly festivities) (owned by the Tokyo National Museum), Rekihaku Ko-hon of Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto) (owned by the National Museum of Japanese History, Important cultural property), Tsukinami Fuzoku-zu Byobu (Screens of Monthly Genre Scenes) (owned by the Tokyo National Museum, Important cultural property), Tohaku Mohon (copy) of Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (owned by the Tokyo National Museum), *Junikagetsu Miyako Fuzoku Emaki (picture scroll depicting the events of twelve months in Kyoto) (owned by the National Museum of Japanese History), *Higashiyama Meisho-zu Byobu (screens of famous scenic places in Higashiyama) (owned by the National Museum of Japanese History), Tsukinami Fuzoku-zu Byobu (Screens of Monthly Genre Scenes) (owned by the Tobacco & Salt Museum) (* indicates the material exhibited for the first time. Hereinafter, the same applies.)

2 Development of Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto -- Shifting toward genre paintings and new representation of power --

Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto in the early stage, in which people in power commissioned painters to paint the capital city, Kyoto, started developing in several directions at the end of the Muromachi period, that is, toward paintings with attention focused on genre scenes of the same period, those depicting critical viewpoints on people in power, those depicting the location of power itself away from Kyoto and those depicting the political ceremony called Gyoko, etc.

【Main Artifacts】

Rekihaku Otsu-hon of Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (owned by the National Museum of Japanese History, Important cultural property), Rekihaku D-hon of Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (owned by the National Museum of Japanese History), Rekihaku C-hon of Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (owned by the National Museum of Japanese History), Kan’ei Gyoko-ki Emaki (owned by the National Museum of Japanese History)

3 From Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto to Genre Paintings -- Work and leisure, from outdoors to indoors --

Starting in the Azuchi-momoyama period or thereabouts, people were mainly depicted in paintings, which resemble close-up pictures of parts of the Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto. At the beginning, outdoor drinking parties and dances were depicted. Paintings of indoor leisure activities separate from the surroundings increased, and genre paintings depicting scenes on streets were also created. Paintings depicting the work of craftsman were continuously created, and towns depicted in Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto became increasingly full of craftsmen.

【Main Artifacts】

Giro-yuraku-zu (depicting leisure activities at brothels) (owned by the National Museum of Japanese History), Rinbu-yuraku-zu (depicting dance activities) (owned by the National Museum of Japanese History), Genre Paintings (owned by the Tobacco & Salt Museum), scrolls of craftsmen and genre paintings (owned by the National Museum of Japanese History), Rekihaku F-hon of Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (owned by the National Museum of Japanese History), *Watari Date-hon of Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto (owned by the Date City Kaitaku Kinen Museum)

4 Interests in famous scenic places -- Scroll paintings and topography --

Political content disappeared from Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto, and genre paintings became independent. Then, Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto turned into decorative paintings with the subject matter of famous scenic places in Kyoto. On the other hand, popular interest in famous scenic places was raised, and topographies such as guidebooks to famous scenic places were published, which had an influence on Screens of Scenes In and Around Kyoto.

【Main Artifacts】

Rekihaku E-hon of Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (owned by the National Museum of Japanese History), Kyo-warabe (owned by the National Institute of Japanese Literature), Miyako Meisho-zu-e (paintings of famous scenic places of the capital city) (owned by the National Institute of Japanese Literature), Kyoto Meisho-zu Byobu (owned by the National Museum of Japanese History), Karaku Ichiran-zu (owned by the National Museum of Japanese History), Kyoto Ichiran-zu (owned by the National Museum of Japanese History)

Rekihaku Ko-hon of Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (scene of Furyu-odori dance)   * Higashiyama Meisho-zu Byobu (scene of Kiyomizu Temple)
Rekihaku Ko-hon of Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (scene of Furyu-odori dance)
(Muromachi period, owned by the National Museum of Japanese History, Important cultural property)
 
* Higashiyama Meisho-zu Byobu (scene of Kiyomizu Temple)
(Muromachi period, owned by the National Museum of Japanese History)
(* indicates a material exhibited for the first time. Hereinafter, the same applies.)
Rekihaku Otsu-hon of Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (scene of Goryo-e which is a ritual ceremony to calm the spirit of a deceased person)   * Junikagetsu Miyako Fuzoku Emaki (scene of May)
Rekihaku Otsu-hon of Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (scene of Goryo-e which is a ritual ceremony to calm the spirit of a deceased person)
(Azuchi-momoyama period, owned by the National Museum of Japanese History, Important cultural property)
 
* Junikagetsu Miyako Fuzoku Emaki (scene of May)
(Edo period, owned by the National Museum of Japanese History)
Rinbu-yuraku-zu (part)   Shokunin (craftsmen) Fuzoku Emaki (part)
Rinbu-yuraku-zu (part)
(Edo period, owned by the National Museum of Japanese History)
 
Shokunin (craftsmen) Fuzoku Emaki (part)
(Edo period, owned by the National Museum of Japanese History)
Rekihaku F-hon of Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (scene of Gyoko)   * Watari Date-hon of Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (scene around Nijo Castle)
Rekihaku F-hon of Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (scene of Gyoko)
(Edo period, owned by the National Museum of Japanese History)
 
* Watari Date-hon of Rakuchu-rakugai-zu Byobu (scene around Nijo Castle)
(Edo period, owned by the Date City Kaitaku Kinen Museum)

Note: Please note that items in the exhibition are subject to change.