Reports on Conferences and Publications by Year

March 31, 2016

Map materials relating to Philipp Franz von Siebold in the Netherlands and Germany: With a focus on Leiden, Munich and the Brandenstein Castle

the date of publication: 31 March 2016

editor : Hiro’o Aoyama

authors : Hiro’o Aoyama, Masahiro Mikawa

published by : National Museum of Japanese History Inter-University Research Institute Corporation, National Institutes for the Humanities

The National Institutes for the Humanities (Inter-University Research Institute Corporation) has promoted the NIHU Research Project: International Collaborative Research on Japan-related Documents and Artifacts Overseas on a six-year program beginning in 2010. Large-scale joint research, Basic Research in the Siebold Family Collection and Other Materials Collected in Japan and Taken Overseas in the Nineteenth Century, has been conducted as Category A within the project (lead research representatives: Hiroshi Kurushima (2010-14) and Kaori Hidaka (2015-16)). The present report, Map Materials relating to Philipp Franz von Siebold in the Netherlands and Germany: With a Focus on Leiden, Munich and the Brandenstein Castle, represents a compilation of the results of the research of the team that undertook surveys of Siebold-related map materials (map group) within the Leiden B (maps, illustrations, etc.) team involved in the large-scale joint research, Preparation of illustrated catalogs of Japan collections in the Netherlands (Leiden University, National Museum of Ethnology in Leiden, etc.) (research representative: Hiro’o Aoyama).

The objective of the Leiden B team (map group) was the preparation of catalogs of map materials of Philipp Franz von Siebold forming a major collection of materials as Japan-related map materials in the Netherlands based on surveys of source materials, focusing primarily on the Leiden University, National Museum of Ethnology in Leiden and other locations. Along with this, surveys of Siebold-related map materials located outside of Leiden were also conducted and the preparation of catalogs of the materials was planned.

Siebold-related map materials in the Leiden University Library and elsewhere in Leiden have thus far been investigated by many researchers, a portion of which has become widely known through photographic and other media. That does not mean, however, that data reflecting documentary material research and based on surveys of the source materials for every single map item is necessarily widely available. In addition, although Siebold-related map materials in Munich’s Five Continents Museum (the former State Museum of Ethnology) and in the possession of the Brandenstein-Zeppelin family (descendants of Siebold; Schluchtern, Germany) have been maintained as comprehensive collections, hardly any efforts have been made to prepare catalogs based on surveys of the source documents or carry out comparative examinations using these map materials and the map materials located in Leiden. Such efforts would be looked upon as an essential process for the purpose of gaining an overall comprehension of the Siebold-related map materials and, in that sense, the present research can be considered significant.

Surveys of the source materials were conducted in 2010, 2013 and 2015 of the Siebold-related map materials located in Leiden, i.e., the Leiden University Library, East Asian Library at Leiden University and the National Museum of Ethnology in Leiden as well as a portion of those map materials that are on loan to or on exhibit at the Siebold House. Through these surveys, we sought to identify the maps collected by Siebold during his first trip to Japan, centered in a survey of source map materials listed in particular in the Catalogus librorum et manuscriptorum Japonicorum: a Ph .Fr .de Siebold collectorum, annexa enumeratione illrorum, qui in museo regio Hagano servantur prepared by Siebold (commentary by Hoffman) (referred to below as the Siebold-Hoffman Catalog). The outcome of the surveys is given in Part 2 of this report as the Siebold-Hoffman Catalog and List of Siebold-related map materials located in Leiden.

In addition, surveys of source materials were conducted in 2010 and 2013 targeting the Siebold-related map materials in the Five Continents Museum in Munich and, in 2010, Siebold-related map materials in the Brandenstein Castle and catalogs of these materials were prepared. The results of the former survey are given in Part 3 of the report as the List of Siebold-related map materials in the collection of the Five Continents Museum in Munich and the latter in Part 4 as the List of Siebold-related map materials in the Brandenstein-Zeppelin Family Archives.

The Siebold-related map materials at the Five Continents Museum consist primarily of map materials collected by Siebold during his second trip to Japan and the circumstances of their collection differ from the group of Siebold-related map materials located in Leiden centered in map materials collected during his first trip to Japan. Furthermore, the 79 items of Siebold-related map materials in the Brandenstein-Zeppelin Family Archives consist for the most part of hand-written tracings, drafts, proofs and so forth made by Siebold himself, which, in character, are entirely different from the map materials in the University of Leiden, National Museum of Ethnology in Leiden and the Five Continents Museum, which consist mainly of items that were collected in a completed form.

Preparing catalogs of these Siebold-related map materials from three differing perspectives makes it possible to gain a general understanding of the Siebold-related map materials. In addition, a cross comparison of the materials not only makes it possible, for example, to examine the dissimilarities in map collection at the time of Siebold’s first and second trips to Japan but also specifically clarifies his classification method and its transitions as well as his process of editing, which have been essentially lacking in examinations to date, while furthermore establishing an environment for appraising the manner in which Siebold viewed map documents.

Plans have been made to release the results of research relating to Siebold-related map materials at the Five Continents Museum and in the Brandenstein-Zeppelin Family Archives in the exhibition project Siebold’s Japan Museum (tentative title) scheduled to be held at the National Museum of Japanese History beginning in July 2016 (itinerant exhibits in Tokyo, Nagasaki, Nagoya and Osaka). In addition, it will also be possible to access the Siebold-related map materials at the Five Continents Museum on the Internet in both Japanese and English as an illustrated catalog.

Finally, we would like to express our appreciation to the Leiden University Library and East Asian Library, National Museum of Ethnology in Leiden, Siebold House, the Five Continents Museum and Dr. Constantine von Brandenstein-Zeppelin for providing us with the opportunity to survey these valuable materials. We also reserve a special word of thanks for Dr. Matthi Forrer of the National Museum of Ethnology in Leiden and Dr. Kuniko Forrer of Siebold House for their exceptional cooperation in the surveys overall in Leiden.

 

Hiro’o Aoyama


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